Neuropathy Massage

How does Massage Help?

Massage helps recover feeling and may even reduce some of the pain, but relief (disappear) or cure (remove the damage) can not. It could also help limit further damage occurs. Anyway require treatment under control glucose (sugar) and where possible keep walking, if you stop walking or short walks can be further reduced mobility (by neuropathy but mostly other reasons) in addition to low-impact exercise (walking) will help maintain good glucose levels and avoid other problems that often come with diabetes (cholesterol, heart, etc) Water with shoes, diabetic shoes are recommended to avoid the formation of sores that get complicated, and there are diabetic socks that are seamless and springs are softer to prevent sores and diabetic foot.

What is peripheral neuropathy?

Your peripheral nervous system connects the nerves from your brain and spinal cord, or central nervous system, to the rest of your body. This includes your:

  • arms
  • hands
  • feet
  • legs
  • internal organs
  • mouth
  • face

The job of these nerves is to deliver signals about physical sensations back to your brain.

Peripheral neuropathy is a disorder that occurs when these nerves malfunction because they’re damaged or destroyed. This disrupts the nerves’ normal functioning. They might send signals of pain when there’s nothing causing pain, or they might not send a pain signal even if something is harming you. This can be due to:

  • an injury
  • systemic illness
  • an infection
  • an inherited disorder

The disorder is uncomfortable, but treatments can be very helpful. The most important thing to determine is whether peripheral neuropathy is the result of a serious underlying condition.

SYMPTOMSWhat are the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy?

The three types of peripheral nerves are:

  • sensory nerves, which connect to your skin
  • motor nerves, which connect to your muscles
  • autonomic nerves, which connect to your internal organs

Peripheral neuropathy can affect one nerve group or all three.

The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include:

  • tingling in the hands or feet
  • a feeling like you’re wearing a tight glove or sock
  • sharp, stabbing pains
  • numbness in the hands or feet
  • a weak, heavy feeling in the arms and legs, which sometimes may feel like your legs or arms lock in place
  • regularly dropping things from your hands
  • a buzzing or shocking sensation
  • thinning of the skin
  • a drop in blood pressure
  • sexual dysfunction, especially in men
  • constipation
  • digestive difficulty
  • diarrhea
  • excessive sweating

These symptoms can also indicate other conditions. Make sure you tell your doctor about all of your symptoms.

CAUSESWhat are the causes of peripheral neuropathy?

People who have a family history of peripheral neuropathy are more likely to develop the disorder. However, a variety of factors and underlying conditions may also cause this condition.

Generalized diseases

Nerve damage caused by diabetes is one of the most common forms of neuropathy. This leads to numbness, pain, and a loss of sensation in the extremities. The risk of neuropathy increases for people who:

According to the University of Chicago’s Center for Peripheral Neuropathy (UCCPN), nearly 60 percent of people with diabetes have some sort of nerve damage. This damage is often due to high blood sugar levels.

Other chronic diseases that may cause nerve damage include:

  • kidney disorders in which high amount of toxins build up in the body and damage nerve tissue
  • hypothyroidism, which occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormone, leading to fluid retention and pressure surrounding nerve tissues
  • diseases that cause chronic inflammation and can spread to the nerves or damage connective tissue surrounding nerves
  • deficiencies of vitamins EB-1, B-6, and B-12, which are essential to nerve health and functioning

Injury

Physical trauma is the most common cause of injury to the nerves. This can include car accidents, falls, or fractures. Inactivity, or holding still too long in one position, can also cause neuropathy. Increased pressure on the median nerve, a nerve in the wrist that supplies feeling and movement to the hand, causes carpal tunnel syndrome. This is a common type of peripheral neuropathy.

Alcohol and toxins

Alcohol can have a toxic effect on nerve tissue, putting people with severe alcoholism at a higher risk of peripheral neuropathy.

Exposure to toxic chemicals like glue, solvents, or insecticides, either through chemical abuse or in the workplace, can also cause nerve damage. Additionally, exposure to heavy metals such as lead and mercury can also cause this condition.

Infections and autoimmune disorders

Certain viruses and bacteria directly attack nerve tissue.

Viruses such as herpes simplex, varicella-zoster virus, which causes chickenpox and shingles, and Epstein-Barr virus damage sensory nerves and cause intense episodes of shooting pain.

Bacterial infections such as Lyme disease can also cause nerve damage and pain if they aren’t treated. People with HIV or AIDS can also develop peripheral neuropathy.

Autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus affect the peripheral nervous system in various ways. Chronic inflammation and damage to tissues throughout the body, as well as pressure caused by inflammation, can all lead to severe nerve pain in the extremities.

Medications

Certain medications may also cause nerve damage. These include:

Recent research in The Journal of Family Practice also suggests that statins, a class of drugs used to lower cholesterol and prevent cardiovascular disease, may also cause nerve damage and increase the risk for neuropathy.

 

 

 

 

 

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